SUBSCRIBE |  

Forgot Your Username and Password? Click here.

Not a subscriber? Join Now!

 

This month, gr contributor, BOB MOORE, shares his secret literary diet with us. If you would like to share your thoughts or opinions with gr readers email the editor. We'd love to hear from you.
Read more...

Articles in this issue

See all Articles

Archive Discoveries

  • From an investigation into the scandals of the Catholic Church by Tom Keneally to Jeffrey Archer’s thrilling last instalment in the ‘Clifton Chronicles’ series or a tale of a shrewd female locksmith in the time of Queen Elizabeth I, these books will delight you over the long, languid days of summer. Read on >
  • Read this and the ordinary world disappears,’ says Stephen King of
‘The Passage’ series. ANGUS DALTON talks with bestselling author JUSTIN CRONIN about his post-apocalyptic trilogy, the vampiric creatures he created to end humanity, and the last instalment of the series, The City of Mirrors. Read on >
  • Australian author of literary and crime fiction DOROTHY JOHNSTON writes about the real-life kidnapping of a camel, coming home to Victoria’s Bellarine Peninsula, and how she came to write Through a Camel’s Eye. Read on >
  • CATHY BURKE is the CEO of The Hunger Project Australia, an organisation that aims to end hunger in every part of the world by 2030. She has raised tens of millions of dollars to help empower people in Africa, India, Bangladesh and South America to feed themselves. We asked Cathy about the books that she has enjoyed reading and which have shaped her life, and we also talk about her own book, Unlikely Leaders. Read on >
  • After reading a few thrillers lately I got to thinking about writers in the crime and thriller genres and the research they need to do to make their books seem real. Research can be an exciting part of writing any book. Determining how a killer might think and how their victim could become entrapped is one thing, but I can’t imagine looking at dead people or reading detailed reports of the methods that serial killers use to stalk and murder their prey.That’s the sort of awful stuff police deal with and psychologically struggle with for the rest of their lives. But could even researching this sort of thing affect a writer?  Read on >
  • The mystery surrounding Agatha Christie’s 1926 disappearance provided the inspiration for On the Blue Train, the second novel of US-based Australian author KRISTEL THORNELL. She tells MAUREEN EPPEN how her research led her to parts of England where the celebrated mystery author lived – and to the North Yorkshire hotel wher she spent jer 'lost' days. Read on >
  • If you set out to write a thriller, you’re going to have to do some research. And while your story will be fiction, you’ll probably uncover more than a few fascinating real-world facts, as Australian thriller author L A LARKIN discovered while researching for her latest novel, Devour. Read on >
  • Australian film director BRUCE BERESFORD (Driving Miss Daisy, Paradise Road) and film producer SUE MILLIKEN (Black Robe and Sirens) have collaborated on several films over their long careers. Their new book, There’s a Fax from Bruce: Edited correspondence between Bruce Beresford & Sue Milliken 1989- 1996, collects the communications – full of industry gossip, news and thoughts on books and films – from a pre-email era between these two filmmaking luminaries. They tell us here about the books that have influenced them. Read on >
  • The rugged beauty of England’s Lake District looms large in the latest psychological thriller by Perth-based author SARA FOSTER. She shares her passion for the natural world and her concerns about the potential impacts of electronic media with MAUREEN EPPEN. Read on >
  • When she’s not training her inquisitorial blowtorch on politicians and other people who have questions to answer, ABC reporter and presenter SARAH FERGUSON loves to delve into a book. Her new book, The Killing Season Uncut, recounts the behind-the-scenes tales of the television program about the tumultuous Rudd–Gillard years. We asked the multi-award winning Four Corners reporter to tell us about the books that have influenced her. Read on >
  • Best known to TV audiences as Goliath fromthequiz show The Chase, MATT PARKINSON was also one half of the Empty Pockets comedy duo. He cleaned up as a champion on Sale of the Century in the 1990s and since then he has served as the brains trust on ABC TV’s The Einstein Factor. We asked this big man (he’s nearly two metres tall) with a big brain about the books that have made him the brainiac that he is.  Read on >

Book Reviews in this issue

  • In 1997, Sara Morgan was brutally murdered in the woods near her college at the hands of her boyfriend, Blake Campbell. But Blake is acquitted, after being declared temporarily insane. The whole community has been impacted by the crime, many seeking justice, revenge, forgiveness, the need for complete answers or just the desire to move on. Nothing Can Hurt You is a beautiful but unnerving thriller, that goes to the heart of violence and its impacts. Read on >

  • Goldin does a good job weaving the two stories together, as Rachael covers the rape trial but is simultaneously compelled to investigate the past death of Jenny Stills. The subject matter is tough, being that of rape, which makes it an emotional read but it is a solid thriller. I was expecting the book to start off at a faster pace, but it builds as you head towards the middle and, although the ending was not unexpected, it was vivid writing and I was compelled to get to the very last page. Read on >

  • The Daddy Animal Book is all about Daddies and their babies. Every page has a daddy and one adorable little baby, and sometimes more, especially when it’s a daddy turkey or daddy goose. We probably know that a daddy goose is a gander and his baby is a gosling but did you know that a daddy turkey is a gobbler and his baby is a poult? There are lovely stories about how the Daddies protect their families. My favourite is how the Daddy Penguin balances his egg on his toes next to his tummy and away from the cold ice, while his mate goes out to look for food. This is another perfect little book for the littlies, or maybe a fun present for a dad? Read on >

  • This is a very important book about a serious subject but the author and illustrator, Thomas Mayor and Blak Douglas, have written it so simply and illustrated it so beautifully that it should speak to the hearts of all of our children. Hopefully it will find its way into the hands of every child.  Read on >

  • This is an intriguing and entertaining, magical adventure. At first, it seems the children have no possible way out of their dilemma. The spell on the house has strict rules, which make it even more difficult for them and yet they find ways to circumvent those restrictions. Children are often good at finding ways to get around the rules. Williams draws the reader into the story and makes even the most preposterous ideas seem utterly plausible. It’s a wild ride with plenty of tension and surprising twists, and with a very satisfying ending. Read on >

  • The Republic of Birds is an amazing tale of risk and adventure. I think Olga’s character is what makes this story so special, as her relationship with her father, stepmother and sister is something everyone can understand. I would specifically recommend this story to teen and pre-teen girls, or to anyone who enjoys an easy and compelling read. Read on >

  • Cultural differences can mask the fact that, beneath it all, we’re much the same. Lochie’s family’s problems aren’t because they’re Australian but because of the way they handle life. Fusillo shows us that the things that matter – the things we all need – are love, respect, understanding and compassion. Hopefully, this story will help young readers look past the things that make us different and recognise the things we share, and to see that our country is the richer for the diversity and colour that newer Australians bring. Read on >

  • That it would all end badly was fairly obvious, but the Ribbon Boys, as they called themselves, being younger than the rebel Ribbonmen of Ireland, had some fine old adventures on the way. It’s a ripping read. Read on >

  • The Space Between nails a perfect balance of being thought-provoking and enlightening as well as hilarious.  Read on >

  • The illustrator, Heidi Cooper Smith, has made Garbage Guts such an incredible beast with all sorts of rubbish making up his huge body, that you could feel a little sorry for him. It really isn’t his fault that he’s so full of rubbish as we humans keep feeding him. But, being a children’s book, there’s a happy ending, and a clever one, as a monster full of trash can always be changed into lots of different things. A fun book with an important message, and a big poster of this scary monster for the bedroom wall. Read on >

See all Book Reviews for this Issue

The Paris Collaborator