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It’s always a joy seeing the book you love come to life. As the year rolls on, it seems like there’s a new book adaptation being announced every day. So which ones are worth a look? Here are some you’ll definitely want to keep your eyes peeled for when they hit cinemas soon.
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Articles in this issue

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Archive Discoveries

  • RITU MENON loves to travel and she loves to sample the local fare of the places her journeys take her to.Her new book, Loitering with Intent: Diary of a happy traveller, is derived from over a decade of travel journal writing. Here she recounts how she came to write the book and recalls a couple of fabulous Italian feasts. Read on >
  • Real-life historical figures and 18th-century court cases dealing with adultery inspired one of two interwoven storylines in The Wife’s Tale, a new novel by Australian author CHRISTINE WELLS. She tells MAUREEN EPPEN how the true events from the past inform her tale of scandal, intrigue, murder – and love.  Read on >
  • Novelist and journalist MAGGIE ALDERSON spent her gap year as a ‘ferocious punk rocker’ working at an advertising agency and starting her own punk fanzine, for which she interviewed Bob Geldoff and Billy Idol. She went on to become the editor of Evening Standard and Elle in London. She also spent eight years in Australia as editor of Cleo and Mode, and covering fashion shows in Milan and Paris for The Sydney Morning Herald. Now back in the UK, Maggie has just released a new novel, The Scent of You. She tells us why reading fairy stories is good training for any writer, who her literary crush is, and why War and Peace is the most emotionally involving books she's ever read. Read on >
  • JIM OBERGEFELL led a class action in the US Supreme Court that established marriage equality nationwide for Americans. Love Wins, co-written with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist DEBBIE CENZIPER, is the story of the love that inspired the fight for justice. ANGUS DALTON reports. Read on >
  • Church attendance has been plummeting for decades, yet enrolments for church-based schools are soaring. Nearly all non-churchgoers say that they like having a church in their suburb – although they never go inside it. Leading social researcher HUGH MACKAY takes a look at our contradictory attitudes to religion in his new book, Beyond Belief. In this article, Hugh recounts a part of his own spiritual journey and how he came to write the book. Read on >
  • Kentucky-based writer KAYLA RAE WHITAKER tells gr about her debut novel, The Animators, which follows the turbulent creative partnership between two indie animators in New York City. Read on >
  • The town of Sorrento in southern Italy sits high on a clff above the Tyrrhenian Sea, whose waters are sobuoyant and warm that you can doze off while floating on its surface. But as author KATE FURNIVALL found, the nearby city of Naples is steeped in a history of danger and wartime poverty. The UK author tells gr her latest novel, The Liberation, was inspired by the secret tunnels, mafia strongholds and the of child street gangs she encountered on a recent visit to the Bay of Naples. Read on >
  • ALL IS GIVEN: A MEMOIR IN SONGS by LINDA NEIL She’s a Brisbane-based songwriter and an awardwinning producer of radio documentaries, and in this memoir LINDA NEIL travels the world, playing music and meeting people along the way. In this extract she recalls as a teenager being given the seemingly tedious duty of reading books to a blind neighbour. But what happened next surprised both the reader and the listener. Read on >
  • SABRINA HAHN has been WA’s go-to dispenser of green-thumb advice to radio listeners for more than 20 years. Now, in Sabrina’s Dirty Deeds, she shows you what to do in your garden and when to do it. In this extract she outlines how to encourage good predatory insects. Read on >
  • Writer MIKE LUCAS and illustrator JENNIFER HARRISON tell gr about Olivia’s Voice, a new picture book about a deaf girl. Read on >
  • The exact percentage of people with dyslexia is unknown, but it’s estimated at between 5 and 17 per cent of the population. And many people may not even be aware that they have the condition. There’s no cure for it, but now there’s a new way to help people overcome dyslexia – and it’s as simple as using a new font. Read on >

Book Reviews in this issue

  • Patchett is a master novelist of family life. Her compelling characters struggle to maintain their relationships. They all have different attitudes to the demands of forgiveness. Some struggle to forgive the past, while others overcome this by the greater desire to accept and enjoy the present. This gives the plot many surprising twists and turns and Danny’s memories blend in effortlessly with the present action, just like our ghosts from the past often do. Read on >

  • This gripping story ranges from the late 19th century in Finland to 1930s Oregon, taking in WWI; industrial unrest; farming and logging; salmon fishing; bootlegging during Prohibition; births, deaths and marriages; and, always, the importance of family in Aino’s life. Those fictional Finns who tamed the wilderness, coping with family tragedy as well as extreme weather, did it all with ‘sisu’ that Finnish concept described as stoic determination, tenacity of purpose, grit, bravery, resilience, and hardiness. Finns themselves believe it expresses their national character. Read on >

  • The Secrets We Kept is enjoyable and the characters are interesting. The film rights for this novel have been sold, and I imagine it will make a splendid and entertaining movie. Read on >

  • This author’s first bestselling memoir, Eat, Pray, Love, was variously described as self-indulgent or marvellous. In a nod to some critics who found that contentious memoir portrayed an indulged, privileged white woman, Gilbert has this novel’s narrator to be just that, and what’s more, eventually realises it. Read on >

  • Quichotte is a fabulist tale that is satirical, speculative and sometimes bewildering. You’re either going to love Rushdie’s verbosity or you’ll take violently against it. Quichotte is for people who like their sentences long, their characters complex and gravitate to high-concept narrative themes. It’s highly unlikely you’ll read anything quite like it. Read on >

  • Lucy Treloar has conjured a world that is not so different from our own but the political, social, environmental and legal consequences that climate change has brought are slowly revealed. The best and worst of human nature is on display: from suspicious bystanders to trigger-happy vigilantes to those who offer help, even if it is in small ways. Kitty is a tough character and her journey is memorable. Part The Road, part western, part mystery, this is a brilliant novel. Read on >

  • The littlies will love the rhythm and rhyme in this enchanting tale. And the beautiful woodland paintings on each page bring such magic to the story. And there’s a lovely little twist at the end. A perfect bedtime story. Read on >

  • Today, at 10 Pomegranate Street, there are delicious smells coming from each apartment. You see, everyone at Number 10 is preparing a special dish to share with their neighbours. Mister Ping is stir-frying broccoli with sesame and soy while across the hall Maria is mashing avocados for her guacamole. Upstairs Senora Flores is cooking up a black bean soup while on the third floor Miss Ishida is making Oyako Don which is chicken & egg rice. And way up on the fifth floor there are wonderful smells of Peanut Butter & Choc Chip Cookies and Strawberry Crumble. Read on >

  • This is such a clever little story that is so easy to relate to especially as the author’s illustrations are so evocative. And the colours he uses help to tell us exactly how Ravi is feeling. There’s a tiger in all of us isn’t there, especially when we are children. Read on >

  • From the Great White Shark wickedly smiling at you on the first page to the big, friendly Green Sea Turtle on the last, it’s a delight from beginning to end. Don’t miss it. The kids will love it and drive you crazy with all the new facts they’ve learnt. Read on >

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