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In 1919, Australia's Vickers Vimy aircraft made the first ever flight from England to Australia. In Long Flight Home historian and author LAINIE ANDERSON recreates one of the most awe-inspiring – and largely forgotten – chapters in world aviation history, through the perspective of the aircraft’s mechanic, Wally Shiers. Here, Lainie recalls her visit to Adelaide’s Centennial Park Cemetery.  
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Articles in this issue

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Archive Discoveries

  • The author of The Woman Who Changed Her Brain: And other inspiring stories of pioneering brain transformation, busts long-held conceptions about how our minds function. Read on >
  • The BBC released a survey earlier this year in which they asked readers to name the books they had lied about having read. You can see the list below. I think I have read around half, as some I may have read in my youth that I’ve forgotten about (more about that later). How many of them have you read? The truth, please! Read on >
  • A young woman named edie channels the dead through her work with the shady Elysian Society in a dytopian first novel from SARA FLANNERY MURPHY. The Oklahoma-based author tells EMMA STUBLEY about her encounters with ghosts and Greek mythology and how they influened The Possessions. Read on >
  • From an investigation into the scandals of the Catholic Church by Tom Keneally to Jeffrey Archer’s thrilling last instalment in the ‘Clifton Chronicles’ series or a tale of a shrewd female locksmith in the time of Queen Elizabeth I, these books will delight you over the long, languid days of summer. Read on >
  • Novelist and journalist MAGGIE ALDERSON spent her gap year as a ‘ferocious punk rocker’ working at an advertising agency and starting her own punk fanzine, for which she interviewed Bob Geldoff and Billy Idol. She went on to become the editor of Evening Standard and Elle in London. She also spent eight years in Australia as editor of Cleo and Mode, and covering fashion shows in Milan and Paris for The Sydney Morning Herald. Now back in the UK, Maggie has just released a new novel, The Scent of You. She tells us why reading fairy stories is good training for any writer, who her literary crush is, and why War and Peace is the most emotionally involving books she's ever read. Read on >
  • Thirteen-year-old gamer Beth loves fighting beasts and solving riddles in her favourite online game, Tordon. But she soon faces her own adventure when she and her gaming nemesis are sucked into a new adventure filled world where they have to fight for their own survival. Into Tordon is a collaborative novel by 9 authors, written under the pseudonym of Z F Kingbolt. Good Reading talks to Editor-in-Chief Zena Shapter about the collaborative writing process, gaming and the adventures in the real world that mimic those found on the screen. Read on >
  • Creativity is often thought of as a special gift bestowed on only a handful of lucky people. But as Australian novelist SUE WOOLFE points out, it’s a skill that you can cultivate. Here are five tips she used to create her latest collection of stories, Do You Love Me or What? Read on >
  • The exact percentage of people with dyslexia is unknown, but it’s estimated at between 5 and 17 per cent of the population. And many people may not even be aware that they have the condition. There’s no cure for it, but now there’s a new way to help people overcome dyslexia – and it’s as simple as using a new font. Read on >
  • When she was 16, MADELAINE DICKIE went to Denpasar, the capital 
of Bali, on a language exchange program.
 Since then she has been fascinated with Indonesia; she has lived and studied in our northern neighbour for three years and
 she speaks Indonesian fluently. Her first novel, Troppo, tells the story of Penny, an Australian expat who flees from her career- minded boyfriend in Perth to a seemingly carefree 
life of surfing in Indonesia. Madelaine tells us how she came to write the novel. Read on >
  • Best known to TV audiences as Goliath fromthequiz show The Chase, MATT PARKINSON was also one half of the Empty Pockets comedy duo. He cleaned up as a champion on Sale of the Century in the 1990s and since then he has served as the brains trust on ABC TV’s The Einstein Factor. We asked this big man (he’s nearly two metres tall) with a big brain about the books that have made him the brainiac that he is.  Read on >
  • Adelaide writer STEPHEN 
ORR, whose book The Hands
 was longlisted for the 2016 
Miles Franklin Award, likes to
travel the world inspecting
 sites of literary interest – when 
he’s not writing about cattle 
stations and small towns. Here 
he recounts a recent journey to
 the British Isles and Germany on 
which he visited the homes and
 haunts of some of the world’s best known authors. Read on >

Book Reviews in this issue

  • Patchett is a master novelist of family life. Her compelling characters struggle to maintain their relationships. They all have different attitudes to the demands of forgiveness. Some struggle to forgive the past, while others overcome this by the greater desire to accept and enjoy the present. This gives the plot many surprising twists and turns and Danny’s memories blend in effortlessly with the present action, just like our ghosts from the past often do. Read on >

  • This gripping story ranges from the late 19th century in Finland to 1930s Oregon, taking in WWI; industrial unrest; farming and logging; salmon fishing; bootlegging during Prohibition; births, deaths and marriages; and, always, the importance of family in Aino’s life. Those fictional Finns who tamed the wilderness, coping with family tragedy as well as extreme weather, did it all with ‘sisu’ that Finnish concept described as stoic determination, tenacity of purpose, grit, bravery, resilience, and hardiness. Finns themselves believe it expresses their national character. Read on >

  • The Secrets We Kept is enjoyable and the characters are interesting. The film rights for this novel have been sold, and I imagine it will make a splendid and entertaining movie. Read on >

  • This author’s first bestselling memoir, Eat, Pray, Love, was variously described as self-indulgent or marvellous. In a nod to some critics who found that contentious memoir portrayed an indulged, privileged white woman, Gilbert has this novel’s narrator to be just that, and what’s more, eventually realises it. Read on >

  • Quichotte is a fabulist tale that is satirical, speculative and sometimes bewildering. You’re either going to love Rushdie’s verbosity or you’ll take violently against it. Quichotte is for people who like their sentences long, their characters complex and gravitate to high-concept narrative themes. It’s highly unlikely you’ll read anything quite like it. Read on >

  • Lucy Treloar has conjured a world that is not so different from our own but the political, social, environmental and legal consequences that climate change has brought are slowly revealed. The best and worst of human nature is on display: from suspicious bystanders to trigger-happy vigilantes to those who offer help, even if it is in small ways. Kitty is a tough character and her journey is memorable. Part The Road, part western, part mystery, this is a brilliant novel. Read on >

  • The littlies will love the rhythm and rhyme in this enchanting tale. And the beautiful woodland paintings on each page bring such magic to the story. And there’s a lovely little twist at the end. A perfect bedtime story. Read on >

  • Today, at 10 Pomegranate Street, there are delicious smells coming from each apartment. You see, everyone at Number 10 is preparing a special dish to share with their neighbours. Mister Ping is stir-frying broccoli with sesame and soy while across the hall Maria is mashing avocados for her guacamole. Upstairs Senora Flores is cooking up a black bean soup while on the third floor Miss Ishida is making Oyako Don which is chicken & egg rice. And way up on the fifth floor there are wonderful smells of Peanut Butter & Choc Chip Cookies and Strawberry Crumble. Read on >

  • This is such a clever little story that is so easy to relate to especially as the author’s illustrations are so evocative. And the colours he uses help to tell us exactly how Ravi is feeling. There’s a tiger in all of us isn’t there, especially when we are children. Read on >

  • From the Great White Shark wickedly smiling at you on the first page to the big, friendly Green Sea Turtle on the last, it’s a delight from beginning to end. Don’t miss it. The kids will love it and drive you crazy with all the new facts they’ve learnt. Read on >

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