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Augusta Hope lives in Willow Crescent, Hedley Green, with her twin sister Julia and her parents. She is the contrarian, outspoken daughter who wishes she lived anywhere but Hedley Green. Thousands of kilometres away Parfait lives with his mother and father and six siblings in Burundi, Africa. He has a happy childhood until civil war tears his life and family apart.   JOANNA GLEN’s new novel The Other Half of Augusta Hope is a stunning story of hope, love and loss. In this Q&A Joanna talks to us about the golden shores of Spain, her favourite Australian books, and the importance of finding your anam cara – your soul friend.
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Articles in this issue

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Archive Discoveries

  • For many of us, the streets of London or New York are more familiar
than the towns and settlements of the remote north and centre of our own country. But non-Indigenous artist and writer KIM MAHOOD, who spent many years of her childhood on a cattle station amid Indigenous lands, knows these parts of Australia well. In her new book, Position Doubtful, she recounts
 her frequent journeys from her home in Wamboin, near Canberra, back to Indigenous communities in NT and WA. We caught up with Kim in Alice Springs just as she was preparing to head out on a 1000 km road trip. Read on >
  • RITU MENON loves to travel and she loves to sample the local fare of the places her journeys take her to.Her new book, Loitering with Intent: Diary of a happy traveller, is derived from over a decade of travel journal writing. Here she recounts how she came to write the book and recalls a couple of fabulous Italian feasts. Read on >
  • The exact percentage of people with dyslexia is unknown, but it’s estimated at between 5 and 17 per cent of the population. And many people may not even be aware that they have the condition. There’s no cure for it, but now there’s a new way to help people overcome dyslexia – and it’s as simple as using a new font. Read on >
  • Most of Lonely Planet’s publications can fit snugly at the bottom of a backpack, but The Travel Book is a volume best left at home on the coffee table to inspire adventures.  Read on >
  • Recent research has revealed the astonishing capabilities of dogs. We know that they can help vision- impaired people, but they can also sniff out cancer and even help to locate missing people. CAT WARREN in What the Dog Knows recounts how she adopted an unruly German shepherd puppy, Solo, who is eventually trained to locate human corpses. Read on >
  • Australian novelist NICOLA MORIARTY is the youngest of six siblings, two of whom – Jacyln and Liane – are also accomplished novelists. Her latest novel, The Fifth Letter, examines the relationships of a group of friends after a letter-writing dare uncovers a festering cache of secrets andr esentment. ANGUS DALTON reports. Read on >
  • Communicating the most exciting new developments in science to non-scientific readers can be a challenge. But Know This: Today’s most interesting and important scientific ideas, discoveries, and developments, takes up the challenge and lets dozens of eminent scientists tell us what they think are the most interesting recent developments in science. Here are two extracts from the book. Read on >
  • 'Books, and lovers or friends, mark and change us. And we, in turn, mark and change them.' Melbourne novelist CATH CROWLEY writes about her longtime love of secondhand bookshops, and how the histories she found and imagined there led her to write Words in Deep Blue. Read on >
  • He has worked as a wilderness guide, a ranch hand and a dogsled musher – and he’s also a skilled marksman. But ERIK STOREY, a lover of the great outdoors, has come in out of the wild for long enough to turn out his first novel, Nothing Short of Dying. A thriller set in the mountainous landscape of western Colorado, it features Clyde Barr, a man with a military past who is fresh out of prison. We talked with Erik recently about dealing with rejection, the lure of western Colorado and his number-one tip for surviving in the wild. Read on >
  • The mystery surrounding Agatha Christie’s 1926 disappearance provided the inspiration for On the Blue Train, the second novel of US-based Australian author KRISTEL THORNELL. She tells MAUREEN EPPEN how her research led her to parts of England where the celebrated mystery author lived – and to the North Yorkshire hotel wher she spent jer 'lost' days. Read on >
  • Perth crime writer David Whish-Wilson reveals how the history of organised crime in WA and his many encounters with criminals, from teaching writing to inmates to meeting biker gangs, has influenced his novels.  Read on >

Book Reviews in this issue

  • I adored this book. The captivating Allegra leads a strong cast of characters. A delightful, uplifting read. Read on >

  • It’s tempting to read this novel in one sitting, as every chapter demands your undivided attention. This account of the protagonist’s dangerous hitchhiking from Alice Springs towards Melbourne on the Stuart Highway is urgent and full of suspense. Lucy the dog is a beguiling character and plays an important part in the narrative. Animal lovers will enjoy her doggy reactions. Read on >

  • It is beautifully written, with Nunez musing on all kinds of topics, particularly about writing, within each chapter as the woman slowly remakes her life, and that of Apollo, while carrying on her work with students, negotiating life in her apartment building that forbids the keeping of pets and recalling conversations with her dead friend. Read on >

  • This short, powerful read escalates gradually with chilling suspense until the final breath-stopping parade. Eggers stirs up my feelings of helplessness in understanding the wars of other nations and their concept of peace. Read on >

  • Odette is a gentle yet fiercely protective woman and a powerful character. Her story of trying to keep her family together in the face of racism – from belittlement, sneers and aggression to the kind that manifests in systematic, government-sanctioned discrimination – is one of heartbreak, courage and hope. Though set in the ’60s, the story in The White Girl remains relevant. Last year it was revealed that since Kevin Rudd’s 2008 apology for the Stolen Generations, the number of Aboriginal children in out-of-home care has doubled. Indigenous leader Richard Weston said at the time, ‘The system keeps failing Aboriginal families and communities because it is punitive, not supportive.’ The White Girl certainly speaks to that. Read on >

  • This is a wonderful debut from Tabitha Bird. It deals with dark themes – what child Willa is forced to endure is heartbreaking – but this darkness is offset by the beautiful writing, full of evocative images, and an uplifting story about the power of forgiveness, the ability to heal and the magical idea of being able to travel back in time to fix a broken future. The three Willas are wonderful characters, stronger and braver than they believe, and I cheered them on the whole way. Read on >

  • Antonina is a member of the Koryo-saram: a group of Russians of Korean descent that Stalin labelled the ‘Unreliable People’ in the 1920s and exiled en-masse to the furthest reaches of the Soviet Republic, despite whatever services they may have offered the regime. Antonina’s people have been at best, ignored and, at worst, persecuted. Read on >

  • The three stories are presented after the preface and the reader is given the choice to read the stories conventionally, one after the other, or follow the wishes of the Baroness. I chose the Baroness sequence, because duh. And I was absolutely swept away. Read on >

  • A hitchhiker, Gabriel, shows up at the outback police station of Wilbrook in torn clothing stained with sun-dried blood. He says he escaped a killer named Heath, who picked him up from the highway, gave him poisoned water, and strung him up in chains. Heath had gloated to Gabriel that he’d be his 55th murder victim. Read on >

  • Kingdom of the Blind is a cozy crime novel, a tale of love, revenge and tragedy. It’s an accomplished whodunnit with witty dialogue and quirky, eccentric characters. An enjoyable read. Read on >

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