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Superheroes garner fame and acclaim for vanquishing villains and protecting humanity. But have you ever spared a thought for their sidekicks, who often play an instrumental role in their heroes’ success only to get lumped with the laundry? In the new comic book series from New York Times bestselling cartoonist GAVIN AUNG THAN, a trio of sidekicks decide to ditch their boastful bosses. ANGUS DALTON catches the author on the launch day of Super Sidekicks Book One: No Adults Allowed.
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Articles in this issue

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Archive Discoveries

  • Teachers of writing classes often tell their students ‘show, don’t tell’. But showing – which means providing vivid description so that readers can clearly imagine what is being represented – depends to a large extent on memory and an alertness to the present moment. Writer and memoir instructor PATTI MILLER, author of Ransacking Paris, shows here how you can draw on sensory memory to enhance your writing. Read on >
  • The changing moral code and shift in gender roes of World War II provide the backdrop for JENNIFER RYAN's debut novel The Chilbury Ladies' Choir. She tells MAUREEN EPPEN about the people and events that inspired the story. Read on >
  • Marine biologist SHANNON LEONE FOWLER was embracing her fiancé, Sean, in the ocean off the coast of Thailand when a box jellyfish stung and killed him.Thai authorities tried to dismiss his death as a drunk drowning. Traveling with Ghosts follows the months Shannon spent on a strange trajectory through Eastern Europe, fleeing from the ocean and from grief. She tells us how her memoir came to be, 14 years after Sean’s death. Read on >
  • It’s often said that whatever happens in our childhoods resonates throughout the rest of our lives – for good or for ill. This was certainly the case for TIM ELLIOTT, who grew up with a father who suffered from bipolar disorder. TIM GRAHAM spoke to him about the lingering effects of a tumultuous childhood and his memoir ofpaternal madness, Farewell to the Father. Read on >
  • A young woman named edie channels the dead through her work with the shady Elysian Society in a dytopian first novel from SARA FLANNERY MURPHY. The Oklahoma-based author tells EMMA STUBLEY about her encounters with ghosts and Greek mythology and how they influened The Possessions. Read on >
  • The exact percentage of people with dyslexia is unknown, but it’s estimated at between 5 and 17 per cent of the population. And many people may not even be aware that they have the condition. There’s no cure for it, but now there’s a new way to help people overcome dyslexia – and it’s as simple as using a new font. Read on >
  • If you set out to write a thriller, you’re going to have to do some research. And while your story will be fiction, you’ll probably uncover more than a few fascinating real-world facts, as Australian thriller author L A LARKIN discovered while researching for her latest novel, Devour. Read on >
  • Novelist and journalist MAGGIE ALDERSON spent her gap year as a ‘ferocious punk rocker’ working at an advertising agency and starting her own punk fanzine, for which she interviewed Bob Geldoff and Billy Idol. She went on to become the editor of Evening Standard and Elle in London. She also spent eight years in Australia as editor of Cleo and Mode, and covering fashion shows in Milan and Paris for The Sydney Morning Herald. Now back in the UK, Maggie has just released a new novel, The Scent of You. She tells us why reading fairy stories is good training for any writer, who her literary crush is, and why War and Peace is the most emotionally involving books she's ever read. Read on >
  •  Looking for an engrossing historical fiction read? gr has rounded-up eight of the best for you to try.   The books in Diana Gabaldon’s ‘Outlander’ series have undergone a renaissance recently after
being adapted into a BBC
TV series that has gained a cult following. When Claire Randall is thrown back in time from 1945 to 1743 she finds herself in a very different Scotland, where she is branded as an outlander or Sassenach (a derogatory word for an English person) in a country run by clans and invaded by Redcoats. Try this series if you like a well-researched historical sagas that have swashbuckling adventure and a bit of romantic romping. Read on >
  • Find out about the inspiration behind the bestselling brilliance of Graeme Simsion's The Rosie Project, his new novel The Best of Adam Sharp, and how he made a name for himself by dressing as a duck. Read on >
  • Best known to TV audiences as Goliath fromthequiz show The Chase, MATT PARKINSON was also one half of the Empty Pockets comedy duo. He cleaned up as a champion on Sale of the Century in the 1990s and since then he has served as the brains trust on ABC TV’s The Einstein Factor. We asked this big man (he’s nearly two metres tall) with a big brain about the books that have made him the brainiac that he is.  Read on >

Book Reviews in this issue

  • Bridge of Clay is a story about stories, about love and brothers and redemption, and how every little person in every suburban corner is living a life worthy of a Homeric retelling. Commit to this book and the Dunbar boys and the world they inhabit will stay with you forever. Read on >

  • Chris Womersley is wonderfully descriptive writer. I often found myself rereading some of his sentences simply for the pleasure of it. Some of the stories like ‘The Very Edge of Things’ have that underlying creepiness to them that is satisfying and compelling.  Read on >

  • Jaclyn has a cult following from her work as a children’s fantasy writer, and while Gravity is the Thing is set squarely in the adult world of reality, this book carries a dusting of magic. Read on >

  • The Things We Cannot Say is ultimately a novel about doing what you can with whatever life hands you, both today and in times of war. Disappointingly, both storylines had completely predictable endings.  Read on >

  • Rohan Wilson has conjured a completely believable dystopian society, one that could easily come to pass.  Read on >

  • Home Fires intertwines their stories both before and after the devastating event, which irrevocably changed their lives and intensifies the drama of the action. This well-written, emotionally evocative novel had such powerful scenes I could easily imagine this translated onto the big screen. Read on >

  • This is a difficult book to read. There are long sections where very little happens, and almost nothing in the narrative really delves into the psychology of the runaways.        Read on >

  • This is a well-researched and beautifully crafted novel in which Gillham has imagined Anne’s story as a way to tell the stories of the millions whose potential was lost when they perished. Highly recommended. Read on >

  • This is an adorable, fable-like story that carries an ecological message and provokes a rush of empathy in the reader for the creatures we Yumans displace on such a massive scale. This would be a great book to read with kids, who’d have a fun time trying to guess what Fox 8 is trying to say (both metaphorically and literally, as his spelling really is atrocious - ‘fast and nated’ translates to fascinated, for example). George Saunders’s writing can be dark, but there is always a warm and emphatic appeal in his stories for empathy and hope. Read on >

  • Her detailed descriptions of the ghostly underwater environment, the food gathered from the seabed, the equipment and clothes used for diving, and the rituals carried out before the haenyeo dive are fascinating. Read on >

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