SUBSCRIBE |  

Forgot Your Username and Password? Click here.

Not a subscriber? Join Now!

 

When Adnyamathanha man DAMIEN COULTHARD visited a vineyard on the Amalfi coast of Italy, he watched his friends delight about the prospect of sampling wine made from the grapes of a 500-yearold vine. But what about the methods and ingredients his people had been working with for 60 000 years? Damien and his partner, self-taught cook and food expert REBECCA SULLIVAN, seek to rouse similar enthusiasm for native Australian foods with a new cookbook, Warndu Mai (Good Food). Add tang to your dishes with a garnish of citrusy green ants, stew a jam of Illawarra plums and cinnamon myrtle, serve up succulent yabbies with bush tomato and finger lime mayo, and if you’re hungry for some full-on Aussie flavour, go for the vegemite and emu egg omelette. We thought you might like to try this tasty and simple kangaroo carpaccio.
Read more...

Articles in this issue

See all Articles

Archive Discoveries

  • The BBC released a survey earlier this year in which they asked readers to name the books they had lied about having read. You can see the list below. I think I have read around half, as some I may have read in my youth that I’ve forgotten about (more about that later). How many of them have you read? The truth, please! Read on >
  • Australian novelist NICOLA MORIARTY is the youngest of six siblings, two of whom – Jacyln and Liane – are also accomplished novelists. Her latest novel, The Fifth Letter, examines the relationships of a group of friends after a letter-writing dare uncovers a festering cache of secrets andr esentment. ANGUS DALTON reports. Read on >
  • Find out about the inspiration behind the bestselling brilliance of Graeme Simsion's The Rosie Project, his new novel The Best of Adam Sharp, and how he made a name for himself by dressing as a duck. Read on >
  • The exact percentage of people with dyslexia is unknown, but it’s estimated at between 5 and 17 per cent of the population. And many people may not even be aware that they have the condition. There’s no cure for it, but now there’s a new way to help people overcome dyslexia – and it’s as simple as using a new font. Read on >
  • The nose is a wonderful thing. A new study has found that the human nose can distinguish between at least one trillion different smells. I love nothing more than sticking my nose inside a blooming rose as I walk Baxter along the street. But I also have a passionate hatred of the choking diesel fumes disgorged from nearby cruise ships. So even though I may be able to detect over a trillion odours, there are many of them I don’t want to smell! Kate Grenville’s new book, The Case against Fragrance, has had me pondering the aromas, the scents and odours that enter my nose – whether I want them to or not. In 2015 Kate started to get frequent headaches and other signs of ill health and, strangely, they seemed to get worse when she was on tour to promote her latest book.After some effort to isolate the cause, she discovered that it was perfumes or other fragrances that were the culprits. She felt debilitated. She loved to meet her readers but was bombarded with fragrances in crowded rooms. She was compelled to find out what it was about perfumes that could be causing her these health problems. She opened a can of worms. Read on >
  • Adelaide writer STEPHEN 
ORR, whose book The Hands
 was longlisted for the 2016 
Miles Franklin Award, likes to
travel the world inspecting
 sites of literary interest – when 
he’s not writing about cattle 
stations and small towns. Here 
he recounts a recent journey to
 the British Isles and Germany on 
which he visited the homes and
 haunts of some of the world’s best known authors. Read on >
  • FIONA CAPP is the internationally published, award-winning author of three works of non-fiction, including her memoir That Oceanic Feeling – which won the Kibble Award – and five novels, including Gotland, which was shortlisted for the 2014 Queensland Literary Awards. Fiona lives in Melbourne and works as a freelance writer and reviewer. Her latest novel, To Know My Crime, is a story of blackmail, risk, corruption, guilt and consequences set on the Mornington Peninsula. We asked Fiona to tell us about the books that have shaped her view of the world. Read on >
  • The mystery surrounding Agatha Christie’s 1926 disappearance provided the inspiration for On the Blue Train, the second novel of US-based Australian author KRISTEL THORNELL. She tells MAUREEN EPPEN how her research led her to parts of England where the celebrated mystery author lived – and to the North Yorkshire hotel wher she spent jer 'lost' days. Read on >
  • I switched on to watch ABC TV’s The Drum one evening and discovered Jodi Picoult sitting on the panel discussion.What a great performer she is – not only an impressive writer but also an impressive speaker.The discussion at the table was raging around whether a white author has the right, or could even have the understanding, to write about black characters. As a white woman, how could she really know what’s it’s like to be a black woman, let alone a black man? How could she write black characters and make them authentic without knowing how they feel? Read on >
  • We talk with PATRICK HOLLAND, a longlist nominee for the 2011 Miles Franklin Award for his novel The Mary Smokes Boys, about his new novel, One, which tells the story of the real-life Kenniff brothers. These two late-19th-century Queenslanders were Australia’s last bushrangers, and vPatrick questions the extent of their supposed villainy. Read on >
  • Teachers of writing classes often tell their students ‘show, don’t tell’. But showing – which means providing vivid description so that readers can clearly imagine what is being represented – depends to a large extent on memory and an alertness to the present moment. Writer and memoir instructor PATTI MILLER, author of Ransacking Paris, shows here how you can draw on sensory memory to enhance your writing. Read on >

Book Reviews in this issue

  • Bridge of Clay is a story about stories, about love and brothers and redemption, and how every little person in every suburban corner is living a life worthy of a Homeric retelling. Commit to this book and the Dunbar boys and the world they inhabit will stay with you forever. Read on >

  • Chris Womersley is wonderfully descriptive writer. I often found myself rereading some of his sentences simply for the pleasure of it. Some of the stories like ‘The Very Edge of Things’ have that underlying creepiness to them that is satisfying and compelling.  Read on >

  • Jaclyn has a cult following from her work as a children’s fantasy writer, and while Gravity is the Thing is set squarely in the adult world of reality, this book carries a dusting of magic. Read on >

  • The Things We Cannot Say is ultimately a novel about doing what you can with whatever life hands you, both today and in times of war. Disappointingly, both storylines had completely predictable endings.  Read on >

  • Rohan Wilson has conjured a completely believable dystopian society, one that could easily come to pass.  Read on >

  • Home Fires intertwines their stories both before and after the devastating event, which irrevocably changed their lives and intensifies the drama of the action. This well-written, emotionally evocative novel had such powerful scenes I could easily imagine this translated onto the big screen. Read on >

  • This is a difficult book to read. There are long sections where very little happens, and almost nothing in the narrative really delves into the psychology of the runaways.        Read on >

  • This is a well-researched and beautifully crafted novel in which Gillham has imagined Anne’s story as a way to tell the stories of the millions whose potential was lost when they perished. Highly recommended. Read on >

  • This is an adorable, fable-like story that carries an ecological message and provokes a rush of empathy in the reader for the creatures we Yumans displace on such a massive scale. This would be a great book to read with kids, who’d have a fun time trying to guess what Fox 8 is trying to say (both metaphorically and literally, as his spelling really is atrocious - ‘fast and nated’ translates to fascinated, for example). George Saunders’s writing can be dark, but there is always a warm and emphatic appeal in his stories for empathy and hope. Read on >

  • Her detailed descriptions of the ghostly underwater environment, the food gathered from the seabed, the equipment and clothes used for diving, and the rituals carried out before the haenyeo dive are fascinating. Read on >

See all Book Reviews for this Issue

April Subscription Prizes