SUBSCRIBE |  
Forgot Your Username and Password? Click here.

Not a subscriber? Join Now!

 

EMMA HARVEY takes a closer look at the recent winner of the the Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Poetry Prize, RAE WHITE. Rae’s powerful debut poetry collection, Milk Teeth, explores house plants, body parts, and what it’s like to live beyond the gender binary.
Read more...

Articles in this issue

See all Articles

Archive Discoveries

  • This book might have the word ‘tax’ in its title, but don’t let that dreary term fool you. The Great Multinational Tax Rort tells the intriguing tale of how, for decades, multinational corporations have been slithering out of their obligations to pay their fair share of tax, leaving governments with shrinking funds to pay for essential services for their citizens. In this extract, MARTIN FEIL, also the author of The Failure of Free-Market Economics, outlines some of the techniques these business behemoths use to cunningly avoid paying tax – leaving us all the poorer. Read on >
  • The rugged beauty of England’s Lake District looms large in the latest psychological thriller by Perth-based author SARA FOSTER. She shares her passion for the natural world and her concerns about the potential impacts of electronic media with MAUREEN EPPEN. Read on >
  • Best known for his role as a team captain on ABC TV’s Spicks and Specks, ALAN BROUGH has also worked as a radio presenter,
actor and stand- up comedian. In the 1990s he also appeared in a series of TV commercials as a drag queen called Marge. He had always wanted to write, and now he has fulfilled that ambition with his new children’s book, Charlie and the War Against the Grannies. He tells us about the books that have made him the reader and writer that he is today. Read on >
  • Who would have thought that in the largely homogeneous country of China that there could be a group of people who could trace their lineage back to invading Romans? TONY GREY uncovered this intriguing bit of information while travelling in China, and here he tells how he came to write his historical novel, The Tortoise in Asia, which tells the story of Romans travelling along the Silk Road in ancient times. Read on >
  • Australian author of literary and crime fiction DOROTHY JOHNSTON writes about the real-life kidnapping of a camel, coming home to Victoria’s Bellarine Peninsula, and how she came to write Through a Camel’s Eye. Read on >
  • The mystery surrounding Agatha Christie’s 1926 disappearance provided the inspiration for On the Blue Train, the second novel of US-based Australian author KRISTEL THORNELL. She tells MAUREEN EPPEN how her research led her to parts of England where the celebrated mystery author lived – and to the North Yorkshire hotel wher she spent jer 'lost' days. Read on >
  • It’s 100 years since
 Roald Dahl’s birth on 13 September 1916. For many years now, 13 September has been celebrated as Roald Dahl Day.  I love all of Roald Dahl’s books. I love the naughty antics his characters get up to in so many of his stories. I love reading about the fascinating life he led – especially his wartime flying exploits – and I really loved how he made the nasty grandmother in George’s Marvellous Medicine just go ‘pop’ and disappear. I think we all have someone in our life we’d like that to happen to occasionally. If you are yet to read his memoirs – Boy and Going Solo – I can’t recommend them highly enough. Read on >
  • Creativity is often thought of as a special gift bestowed on only a handful of lucky people. But as Australian novelist SUE WOOLFE points out, it’s a skill that you can cultivate. Here are five tips she used to create her latest collection of stories, Do You Love Me or What? Read on >
  • Serious social issues, including the plight of unwed mothers, domestic violence and the place of women in Australia's history are wrapped up in poignant romace in VICTORIA PURMAN's new novel, The Three Miss Allens. She spekas with MAUREEN EPPEN about the inspiration behind the family saga set on the South Australian coast. Read on >
  • Think of the typical problem drinker, and we usually imagine alcoholics, drink-drivers, underage drinkers and the perpetrators of one-punch attacks. The brother of Brisbane writer ELSPETH MUIR was none of these things. But three days after a heavy night of drinking, he was found dead in the Brisbane River – his blood alcohol level was 0.25 at his time of death. Elspeth tells us about her memoir, Wasted, an investigation into Australia’s drinking culture, and what might have been done to prevent Alexander’s death.  Read on >
  • Australian film director BRUCE BERESFORD (Driving Miss Daisy, Paradise Road) and film producer SUE MILLIKEN (Black Robe and Sirens) have collaborated on several films over their long careers. Their new book, There’s a Fax from Bruce: Edited correspondence between Bruce Beresford & Sue Milliken 1989- 1996, collects the communications – full of industry gossip, news and thoughts on books and films – from a pre-email era between these two filmmaking luminaries. They tell us here about the books that have influenced them. Read on >

Book Reviews in this issue

  • This is a story of a thoughtful little boy’s love of exploring the bush and its animals. Of being alone, sitting quietly but feeling the excitement of being part of the world around him. But it’s also a story of a friendship between two children who, even though having their different adventures in different places, can still think and care about one another. No review can do this book justice. The ethereal beauty of the artwork and the author’s poetic language is mesmerising. Every time I turn the pages I see something utterly beautiful and winsome which I have missed before. It is a book to cherish. Read on >

  • But the incredible thing is that all of these people no matter where they are in Australia and what they are doing, are under our most famous constellation, the Southern Cross. And if the sky is clear everyone can look up and see it. And not only in Australia but anywhere in the Southern Hemisphere. We may not find this mind-boggling but maybe the children, if given the chance to read this book, will. And just for fun, the author has hidden his dog, Banjo, on every page, and he’s under the Southern Cross too. Read on >

  • This is a great little book for all those kids who are scared of the dark especially when the thunder is rumbling and the lightning is flashing. Marigold and Marvin find out that often those scary noises aren’t really what they sound like. And that when it’s dark, everything seems worse than it is. If you haven’t met these lovable little mice before, then now is the time to introduce them to your littlies. Read on >

  • This is a fun book where the clever illustrations tell the story. The littlies who read this book won’t be scared as they’ll understand what is happening. Imagination is a wonderful thing. Read on >

  • The Meltdown is a wonderful and witty addition to a growing trend of ‘mis-fit lit’ – books that create unlikely heroes out of the lanky and the loser-ish, rather than the Chosen Ones/Harry Potters that so often forefront the YA genre. Read on >

  • Moriarty’s distinctive voice resonates throughout this story, which is similar in tone to her other book: The Extremely Inconvenient Adventures of Bronte Mettlestone. If you loved that book, you’ll love this one too. The characters are fun, the situation is dire and the adventure is a symphony of danger and intrigue. The only complaint I have is that the author takes a bit too long to get to the crescendo. This would be an ideal gift that could be savoured during school holidays. Read on >

  • The tales are theatrical and extraordinary, with a comprehensive bibliography to support them all. Blending history, biography and science in a style similar to the bestselling UK children’s series ‘Horrible Histories’, this compendium will capture the minds of adults and kids alike. Read on >

  • Dry speculates on the idea that climate change is thrusting us towards devastating disasters. In particular, it explores the insidiousness of drought and the gradual disappearance of water; a resource we simply take for granted. This book will have you thinking about ways to protect a natural resource that could easily dry up. Read on >

  • Wraith was so impossible to put down and beautifully written. It is completely unique, something I have never read of before, each fantastic new idea plunging you deeper into a great adventure! Read on >

  • This is a twist on the classic tale of Beauty and the Beast. However, there’s nothing Disney about it. There’s no singing teapots and a large, fluffy beast dressed in a gentleman’s clothing. This is real. This story explores the agony, the frustration and the unending guilt that comes to a man who is engulfed in a dark and lonely curse. The characters are dynamic and endearing, the plot grows steadily in tension while hope is an ever-shining beacon, and the resolution is satisfying, while leaving room for a sequel. It’s more than a fairy-tale and more than a gothic horror story; it is an absorbing and compelling drama. Read on >

See all Book Reviews for this Issue

Subscribe to Good Reading

The Good People