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If your letter is published this month, you have won a copy of The Lost Girls by Jennifer Spence, valued at $29.99. If your letter is published in the March issue, you will win a copy of Diving into Glass by Caro Llewellyn.
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Articles in this issue

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Archive Discoveries

  • Australian historical novelist Pamela Hart tells us about her latest novel, A Letter From Italy, and Australia's first female war correspondent.  Read on >
  • Thirteen-year-old gamer Beth loves fighting beasts and solving riddles in her favourite online game, Tordon. But she soon faces her own adventure when she and her gaming nemesis are sucked into a new adventure filled world where they have to fight for their own survival. Into Tordon is a collaborative novel by 9 authors, written under the pseudonym of Z F Kingbolt. Good Reading talks to Editor-in-Chief Zena Shapter about the collaborative writing process, gaming and the adventures in the real world that mimic those found on the screen. Read on >
  • The exact percentage of people with dyslexia is unknown, but it’s estimated at between 5 and 17 per cent of the population. And many people may not even be aware that they have the condition. There’s no cure for it, but now there’s a new way to help people overcome dyslexia – and it’s as simple as using a new font. Read on >
  • ABC journalist and science writer IAN TOWNSEND cut his teeth as a novelist in 2007 with Affection, which told the story of a plague outbreak in 1900. His next novel, The Devil’s Eye, was longlisted for the Miles Franklin Award in 2009. Now with Line of Fire, he turns his pen to narrative non-fiction to tell the story of Richard Manson, an 11-year-old boy who was accused of espionage and shot by the Japanese during World War II in New Guinea. Read on >
  • JIM OBERGEFELL led a class action in the US Supreme Court that established marriage equality nationwide for Americans. Love Wins, co-written with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist DEBBIE CENZIPER, is the story of the love that inspired the fight for justice. ANGUS DALTON reports. Read on >
  • When she’s not training her inquisitorial blowtorch on politicians and other people who have questions to answer, ABC reporter and presenter SARAH FERGUSON loves to delve into a book. Her new book, The Killing Season Uncut, recounts the behind-the-scenes tales of the television program about the tumultuous Rudd–Gillard years. We asked the multi-award winning Four Corners reporter to tell us about the books that have influenced her. Read on >
  • GEORGIA BLAIN is a novelist and journalist who lives in Sydney. Her first novel, Closed for Winter, was adapted into movie in 2009. LEONIE DYER asked Georgia about her latest novel, Between a Wolf and a Dog. Read on >
  • LUCY DURNEEN lectures in creative writing in Plymouth, England, and is the assistant editor of the literary journal Short Fiction. We asked her about the apparent resurgence of interest in short stories, her beginnings as a writer, and the blending of realism and fantasy in the stories in her new collection, Wild Gestures. Read on >
  • If you think of the German navy in World War II, then you probably conjure up images of grand-scale conflicts such as the Battle of the Atlantic or the Baltic Sea campaigns. But not so many people are aware that German ships were also on the prowl down in the South Pacific and in the Indian Ocean, where they disguised themselves as ordinary freighters before launching their deadly assaults on unsuspecting Allied craft. False Flags, a new account by Canberra author STEPHEN ROBINSON, tells the story of four German raiders, including the infamous attack by one of them, the Kormoran, on the HMAS Sydney in 1941. GRANT HANSEN reports. Read on >
  • Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre has inspired all kinds of fan fiction and adaptations, such as the 1966 prequel Wide Sargasso Sea. But in this new novel by Sydney resident JENNIFER LIVETT, the lives of Jane Eyre characters become entwined with those of real 19th-century Tasmanians, including doomed Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin. Here Jennifer tells us how she came up with the idea for Wild Island. Read on >
  • Born in London, retired doctor TONY ATKINSON spent the first years of his life in a cage dangling out of a window. But he went on to serve the Queen and Winston Churchill during his early career as a footman and waiter, which he recalls in hilarious stories in he memoir, A Prescribed Life. Read on >

Book Reviews in this issue

  • This is a story of a thoughtful little boy’s love of exploring the bush and its animals. Of being alone, sitting quietly but feeling the excitement of being part of the world around him. But it’s also a story of a friendship between two children who, even though having their different adventures in different places, can still think and care about one another. No review can do this book justice. The ethereal beauty of the artwork and the author’s poetic language is mesmerising. Every time I turn the pages I see something utterly beautiful and winsome which I have missed before. It is a book to cherish. Read on >

  • But the incredible thing is that all of these people no matter where they are in Australia and what they are doing, are under our most famous constellation, the Southern Cross. And if the sky is clear everyone can look up and see it. And not only in Australia but anywhere in the Southern Hemisphere. We may not find this mind-boggling but maybe the children, if given the chance to read this book, will. And just for fun, the author has hidden his dog, Banjo, on every page, and he’s under the Southern Cross too. Read on >

  • This is a great little book for all those kids who are scared of the dark especially when the thunder is rumbling and the lightning is flashing. Marigold and Marvin find out that often those scary noises aren’t really what they sound like. And that when it’s dark, everything seems worse than it is. If you haven’t met these lovable little mice before, then now is the time to introduce them to your littlies. Read on >

  • This is a fun book where the clever illustrations tell the story. The littlies who read this book won’t be scared as they’ll understand what is happening. Imagination is a wonderful thing. Read on >

  • The Meltdown is a wonderful and witty addition to a growing trend of ‘mis-fit lit’ – books that create unlikely heroes out of the lanky and the loser-ish, rather than the Chosen Ones/Harry Potters that so often forefront the YA genre. Read on >

  • Moriarty’s distinctive voice resonates throughout this story, which is similar in tone to her other book: The Extremely Inconvenient Adventures of Bronte Mettlestone. If you loved that book, you’ll love this one too. The characters are fun, the situation is dire and the adventure is a symphony of danger and intrigue. The only complaint I have is that the author takes a bit too long to get to the crescendo. This would be an ideal gift that could be savoured during school holidays. Read on >

  • The tales are theatrical and extraordinary, with a comprehensive bibliography to support them all. Blending history, biography and science in a style similar to the bestselling UK children’s series ‘Horrible Histories’, this compendium will capture the minds of adults and kids alike. Read on >

  • Dry speculates on the idea that climate change is thrusting us towards devastating disasters. In particular, it explores the insidiousness of drought and the gradual disappearance of water; a resource we simply take for granted. This book will have you thinking about ways to protect a natural resource that could easily dry up. Read on >

  • Wraith was so impossible to put down and beautifully written. It is completely unique, something I have never read of before, each fantastic new idea plunging you deeper into a great adventure! Read on >

  • This is a twist on the classic tale of Beauty and the Beast. However, there’s nothing Disney about it. There’s no singing teapots and a large, fluffy beast dressed in a gentleman’s clothing. This is real. This story explores the agony, the frustration and the unending guilt that comes to a man who is engulfed in a dark and lonely curse. The characters are dynamic and endearing, the plot grows steadily in tension while hope is an ever-shining beacon, and the resolution is satisfying, while leaving room for a sequel. It’s more than a fairy-tale and more than a gothic horror story; it is an absorbing and compelling drama. Read on >

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The Good People