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Historical fiction extraordinaire SULARI GENTILL is back with All the Tears in China, another instalment in her ‘Rowland Sinclair Mysteries’ series. Rowland, an artist and amateur detective, travels to Shanghai from Sydney to represent his brother at international wool negotiations. It’s 1935 and Shanghai is a melting pot of cultures, political leanings and trade deals. Rowland is under strict instructions not to meddle in anything untoward. But then there’s a murder – and he’s made a suspect. In this extract, Rowland has just arrived in Shanghai.
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Articles in this issue

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Archive Discoveries

  • It’s often said that whatever happens in our childhoods resonates throughout the rest of our lives – for good or for ill. This was certainly the case for TIM ELLIOTT, who grew up with a father who suffered from bipolar disorder. TIM GRAHAM spoke to him about the lingering effects of a tumultuous childhood and his memoir ofpaternal madness, Farewell to the Father. Read on >
  • The author of The Woman Who Changed Her Brain: And other inspiring stories of pioneering brain transformation, busts long-held conceptions about how our minds function. Read on >
  • A young woman named edie channels the dead through her work with the shady Elysian Society in a dytopian first novel from SARA FLANNERY MURPHY. The Oklahoma-based author tells EMMA STUBLEY about her encounters with ghosts and Greek mythology and how they influened The Possessions. Read on >
  • Aristotle said that metaphor consists in giving a thing a name that belongs to something else. Shakespeare used metaphor when he wrote ‘All the world’s a stage’, drawing parallels between the planet and a theatrical performance space so that we might more easily understand what the world is like. Metaphors, by likening one thing to another, help us to understand things, or aspects of them, that might otherwise be difficult to comprehend. In Metaphors Be With You, DR MARDY GROTHE takes a historical look at how metaphors have been used to understand a huge range of topics, from adversity, beauty and curiosity through to love, war and vanity. Read on >
  • Sydney-based novelist LAUREN SAMS, author of She’s Having Her Baby, has worked for magazines such as Marie Claire, Elle and Cosmopolitan. Her new book, Crazy Busy Guilty, reprises the heroine Georgie Henderson, who tries frantically to juggle work and family. We spoke recently with Lauren, who talked about the US election, writer’s block and wacky parenting strategies.  Read on >
  • He has worked as a wilderness guide, a ranch hand and a dogsled musher – and he’s also a skilled marksman. But ERIK STOREY, a lover of the great outdoors, has come in out of the wild for long enough to turn out his first novel, Nothing Short of Dying. A thriller set in the mountainous landscape of western Colorado, it features Clyde Barr, a man with a military past who is fresh out of prison. We talked with Erik recently about dealing with rejection, the lure of western Colorado and his number-one tip for surviving in the wild. Read on >
  • Australian historical novelist Pamela Hart tells us about her latest novel, A Letter From Italy, and Australia's first female war correspondent.  Read on >
  • FIONA CAPP is the internationally published, award-winning author of three works of non-fiction, including her memoir That Oceanic Feeling – which won the Kibble Award – and five novels, including Gotland, which was shortlisted for the 2014 Queensland Literary Awards. Fiona lives in Melbourne and works as a freelance writer and reviewer. Her latest novel, To Know My Crime, is a story of blackmail, risk, corruption, guilt and consequences set on the Mornington Peninsula. We asked Fiona to tell us about the books that have shaped her view of the world. Read on >
  • For many of the families of servicemen killed in World War I, a terse telegram from the government was never going to be enough to assuage their grief. Families wrote back in their thousands, seeking more information about the fate of their loved ones. It was the task of James M Lean to reply to these families and, as author CAROL ROSENHAIN outlines in The Man Who Carried the Nation’s Grief, he did so with extraordinary empathy and sensitivity. Read on >
  • The mystery surrounding Agatha Christie’s 1926 disappearance provided the inspiration for On the Blue Train, the second novel of US-based Australian author KRISTEL THORNELL. She tells MAUREEN EPPEN how her research led her to parts of England where the celebrated mystery author lived – and to the North Yorkshire hotel wher she spent jer 'lost' days. Read on >
  • SABRINA HAHN has been WA’s go-to dispenser of green-thumb advice to radio listeners for more than 20 years. Now, in Sabrina’s Dirty Deeds, she shows you what to do in your garden and when to do it. In this extract she outlines how to encourage good predatory insects. Read on >

Book Reviews in this issue

  • This is a story of a thoughtful little boy’s love of exploring the bush and its animals. Of being alone, sitting quietly but feeling the excitement of being part of the world around him. But it’s also a story of a friendship between two children who, even though having their different adventures in different places, can still think and care about one another. No review can do this book justice. The ethereal beauty of the artwork and the author’s poetic language is mesmerising. Every time I turn the pages I see something utterly beautiful and winsome which I have missed before. It is a book to cherish. Read on >

  • But the incredible thing is that all of these people no matter where they are in Australia and what they are doing, are under our most famous constellation, the Southern Cross. And if the sky is clear everyone can look up and see it. And not only in Australia but anywhere in the Southern Hemisphere. We may not find this mind-boggling but maybe the children, if given the chance to read this book, will. And just for fun, the author has hidden his dog, Banjo, on every page, and he’s under the Southern Cross too. Read on >

  • This is a great little book for all those kids who are scared of the dark especially when the thunder is rumbling and the lightning is flashing. Marigold and Marvin find out that often those scary noises aren’t really what they sound like. And that when it’s dark, everything seems worse than it is. If you haven’t met these lovable little mice before, then now is the time to introduce them to your littlies. Read on >

  • This is a fun book where the clever illustrations tell the story. The littlies who read this book won’t be scared as they’ll understand what is happening. Imagination is a wonderful thing. Read on >

  • The Meltdown is a wonderful and witty addition to a growing trend of ‘mis-fit lit’ – books that create unlikely heroes out of the lanky and the loser-ish, rather than the Chosen Ones/Harry Potters that so often forefront the YA genre. Read on >

  • Moriarty’s distinctive voice resonates throughout this story, which is similar in tone to her other book: The Extremely Inconvenient Adventures of Bronte Mettlestone. If you loved that book, you’ll love this one too. The characters are fun, the situation is dire and the adventure is a symphony of danger and intrigue. The only complaint I have is that the author takes a bit too long to get to the crescendo. This would be an ideal gift that could be savoured during school holidays. Read on >

  • The tales are theatrical and extraordinary, with a comprehensive bibliography to support them all. Blending history, biography and science in a style similar to the bestselling UK children’s series ‘Horrible Histories’, this compendium will capture the minds of adults and kids alike. Read on >

  • Dry speculates on the idea that climate change is thrusting us towards devastating disasters. In particular, it explores the insidiousness of drought and the gradual disappearance of water; a resource we simply take for granted. This book will have you thinking about ways to protect a natural resource that could easily dry up. Read on >

  • Wraith was so impossible to put down and beautifully written. It is completely unique, something I have never read of before, each fantastic new idea plunging you deeper into a great adventure! Read on >

  • This is a twist on the classic tale of Beauty and the Beast. However, there’s nothing Disney about it. There’s no singing teapots and a large, fluffy beast dressed in a gentleman’s clothing. This is real. This story explores the agony, the frustration and the unending guilt that comes to a man who is engulfed in a dark and lonely curse. The characters are dynamic and endearing, the plot grows steadily in tension while hope is an ever-shining beacon, and the resolution is satisfying, while leaving room for a sequel. It’s more than a fairy-tale and more than a gothic horror story; it is an absorbing and compelling drama. Read on >

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