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In his book, Godley: The man behind the myth, TERRY KINLOCH takes an in-depth look at the life and career of General Sir Alexander Godley. Challenging many of the myths about the general, he seeks to paint the first fully rounded portrait of the man. In this extract, we learn what drove the author to find out more about Godley, and why he wanted to give the descendants of Australian, British, Indian and New Zealand soldiers that Godley commanded during World War I the truth about the general who led their ancestors into battle.
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Articles in this issue

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Archive Discoveries

  • ALL IS GIVEN: A MEMOIR IN SONGS by LINDA NEIL She’s a Brisbane-based songwriter and an awardwinning producer of radio documentaries, and in this memoir LINDA NEIL travels the world, playing music and meeting people along the way. In this extract she recalls as a teenager being given the seemingly tedious duty of reading books to a blind neighbour. But what happened next surprised both the reader and the listener. Read on >
  • Recent research has revealed the astonishing capabilities of dogs. We know that they can help vision- impaired people, but they can also sniff out cancer and even help to locate missing people. CAT WARREN in What the Dog Knows recounts how she adopted an unruly German shepherd puppy, Solo, who is eventually trained to locate human corpses. Read on >
  • gr highlights cookbooks to buy for the discerning foodies in your life. Read on >
  • If you think of the German navy in World War II, then you probably conjure up images of grand-scale conflicts such as the Battle of the Atlantic or the Baltic Sea campaigns. But not so many people are aware that German ships were also on the prowl down in the South Pacific and in the Indian Ocean, where they disguised themselves as ordinary freighters before launching their deadly assaults on unsuspecting Allied craft. False Flags, a new account by Canberra author STEPHEN ROBINSON, tells the story of four German raiders, including the infamous attack by one of them, the Kormoran, on the HMAS Sydney in 1941. GRANT HANSEN reports. Read on >
  • Stretching across generations and set on the Atherton Tablelands where she lives, the latest novel from prolific Australian author BARBARA HANNAY is a saga of loss, love, secrets and salvation. She tells MAUREEN EPPEN 
about her writing life, and how The Grazier's Wife evolved.   Read on >
  • Think of the typical problem drinker, and we usually imagine alcoholics, drink-drivers, underage drinkers and the perpetrators of one-punch attacks. The brother of Brisbane writer ELSPETH MUIR was none of these things. But three days after a heavy night of drinking, he was found dead in the Brisbane River – his blood alcohol level was 0.25 at his time of death. Elspeth tells us about her memoir, Wasted, an investigation into Australia’s drinking culture, and what might have been done to prevent Alexander’s death.  Read on >
  • As a teenager, GAYLE FORMAN was so obsessed with ‘80s movie star Molly Ringwald that she started to imitate the actress’s trademark nervous lip bite – and now she has a permanent scar. After seven bestselling YA novels and a successful movie adaption of one of her books, she talks with ANGUS DALTON about her first book for adults, Leave Me. Read on >
  • FIONA CAPP is the internationally published, award-winning author of three works of non-fiction, including her memoir That Oceanic Feeling – which won the Kibble Award – and five novels, including Gotland, which was shortlisted for the 2014 Queensland Literary Awards. Fiona lives in Melbourne and works as a freelance writer and reviewer. Her latest novel, To Know My Crime, is a story of blackmail, risk, corruption, guilt and consequences set on the Mornington Peninsula. We asked Fiona to tell us about the books that have shaped her view of the world. Read on >
  • If you set out to write a thriller, you’re going to have to do some research. And while your story will be fiction, you’ll probably uncover more than a few fascinating real-world facts, as Australian thriller author L A LARKIN discovered while researching for her latest novel, Devour. Read on >
  • After reading a few thrillers lately I got to thinking about writers in the crime and thriller genres and the research they need to do to make their books seem real. Research can be an exciting part of writing any book. Determining how a killer might think and how their victim could become entrapped is one thing, but I can’t imagine looking at dead people or reading detailed reports of the methods that serial killers use to stalk and murder their prey.That’s the sort of awful stuff police deal with and psychologically struggle with for the rest of their lives. But could even researching this sort of thing affect a writer?  Read on >
  • While researching for a non-fiction book about the botanical history of some of the world’s most popular alcoholic drinks, US author Amy Stewart stumbled across a gin smuggler’s altercation with a officious woman named Constance Kopp. This discovery catalysed her historical crime-fiction series based around Constance and her two sisters, set in New Jersey in 1915. As the second instalment in the series, Lady Cop Makes Trouble, is released, Angus Dalton finds out more. Read on >

Book Reviews in this issue

  • Michael Quetting begins his memoir Papa Goose: One year, seven goslings, and the flight of my life by saying, ‘I’m heavily pregnant with nonuplets. At least that’s pretty much how I feel right now.’ Read a few chapters of this joyous book a night and you’ll go to sleep happy. Read on >

  • With an image on each page, this book has you smiling one minute and then suddenly tearing up. It’s the perfect gift for any dog lover, and you might find yourself to strive harder to live up to the brilliant person your dog sees you as. Read on >

  • Axel Linden’s On Sheep: Diary of a Swedish Shepherd ruminates on another domesticated mammal that even animal lovers don’t tend to look fondly upon. Indeed, calling someone a ‘sheep’ is an insult meant to insinuate stupidity. Read on >

  • The Eastern Curlew explores how Australia’s largest migratory shorebird – which sports an impressive curving bill five times longer than its head – flies 10 000 kilometres from Artic breeding grounds to feed on soldier crabs and molluscs populating mudflats on Australia’s east coast. Read on >

  • Alison Lester, who in 2012, became the Australia’s first Children’s Book Laureate, always writes and illustrates perfect little books for young children. Noni the Pony Rescues a Joey has such charming rhyming verse that it would be a pleasure to read aloud to the littlies. And the wonderfully expressive faces of the animals help to bring this happy little story to life. Read on >

  • Bronwyn Bancroft’s illustrations are, as always, distinctively big, bold and beautiful and the story is simply told by first-time children’s author, Nina Lawrence. But this is a story with a difference. It is a bilingual tale told in English and translated in Djambarrpuynu language from North East Arnhem Land. With many schools now promoting indigenous Australian languages this would be a wonderful introduction and inspiration for their students. Read on >

  • Once in a while, a book comes into your life that is so beautiful that you desperately want to give it to someone you love. This is that book for me. I Am the Seed that Grew the Tree is a collection of poems for children. There’s a poem for every day of the year. Read on >

  • Daykin has a quirky style that takes some getting used to. However, the story rollicks along with such enthusiasm that we soon adjust to the style and are abs orbed by the mystery. The characters are an interesting mix of eccentric, weird and relatively normal. Elvis, the youngest character, is often the most mature and sensible of the group. This is a fun exploration of issues that are important to all of us: who are we, where did we come from, and to whom do we belong? Read on >

  • This is a poignant, often thrilling story – beautifully illustrated by Emily Gravett – that gives permission to the reader to wonder about the greatest mystery of all: what happens afterwards. Read on >

  • For Peter, an unfathomable fear oppresses him. His calculating mind tallies, adds, subtracts and deciphers square roots – all to cloud the fear and allow him a somewhat normal existence. That is, until his mother becomes an unfortunate victim in an assassination attempt and his sister suspiciously disappears. Read on >

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