SUBSCRIBE |  
Forgot Your Username and Password? Click here.

Not a subscriber? Join Now!

 

Garrard Conley, the 19-year-old son of a fundamentalist Southern Baptist preacher, is outed to his family as gay. He agrees to attend a conversion therapy program. The alternative is to be shunned by family, friends and church. 
Read more...

Articles in this issue

See all Articles

Archive Discoveries

  • We chat to aspiring astronaut and sci-fi writer S J Kincaid on haunted graveyards, Star Trek, and her new YA galactic thriller, The Diabolic.  Read on >
  • FIONA CAPP is the internationally published, award-winning author of three works of non-fiction, including her memoir That Oceanic Feeling – which won the Kibble Award – and five novels, including Gotland, which was shortlisted for the 2014 Queensland Literary Awards. Fiona lives in Melbourne and works as a freelance writer and reviewer. Her latest novel, To Know My Crime, is a story of blackmail, risk, corruption, guilt and consequences set on the Mornington Peninsula. We asked Fiona to tell us about the books that have shaped her view of the world. Read on >
  • SABRINA HAHN has been WA’s go-to dispenser of green-thumb advice to radio listeners for more than 20 years. Now, in Sabrina’s Dirty Deeds, she shows you what to do in your garden and when to do it. In this extract she outlines how to encourage good predatory insects. Read on >
  • The town of Sorrento in southern Italy sits high on a clff above the Tyrrhenian Sea, whose waters are sobuoyant and warm that you can doze off while floating on its surface. But as author KATE FURNIVALL found, the nearby city of Naples is steeped in a history of danger and wartime poverty. The UK author tells gr her latest novel, The Liberation, was inspired by the secret tunnels, mafia strongholds and the of child street gangs she encountered on a recent visit to the Bay of Naples. Read on >
  • Heart surgeon PROFESSOR STEPHEN WESTABY has worked for 35 years to save ailing hearts and, in many cases, give his patients a second chance at life. In his new memoir, Fragile Lives, Westaby recounts remarkable and poignant cases, such as the baby who had suffered multiple heart attacks before reaching six months of age. We asked him to tell us a bit about his life as a surgeon. Read on >
  • KIRI FALLS was introduced to the works of English novelist Elizabeth Gaskell (1810-65) when she saw the 2004 BBC production of North & South. Last year, the 150th anniversary of Gaskell’s death, Kiri decided to make a pilgrimage to the newly renovated Manchester home of the great lady. Read on >
  • The rugged beauty of England’s Lake District looms large in the latest psychological thriller by Perth-based author SARA FOSTER. She shares her passion for the natural world and her concerns about the potential impacts of electronic media with MAUREEN EPPEN. Read on >
  • Sydney-based novelist LAUREN SAMS, author of She’s Having Her Baby, has worked for magazines such as Marie Claire, Elle and Cosmopolitan. Her new book, Crazy Busy Guilty, reprises the heroine Georgie Henderson, who tries frantically to juggle work and family. We spoke recently with Lauren, who talked about the US election, writer’s block and wacky parenting strategies.  Read on >
  • Australian historical novelist Pamela Hart tells us about her latest novel, A Letter From Italy, and Australia's first female war correspondent.  Read on >
  • American author and hairdresser DEBORAH RODRIGUEZ lived in the Afghan capital of Kabul for five years, and in that time she founded her own beauty salon and coffee shop. On her return to the US, she wrote a bestselling novel based on the bustling cafe, and now she’s taking us back to Afghanistan in Return to the Little Coffee Shop of Kabul. ANGUS DALTON reports. Read on >
  • Most of Lonely Planet’s publications can fit snugly at the bottom of a backpack, but The Travel Book is a volume best left at home on the coffee table to inspire adventures.  Read on >

Book Reviews in this issue

  • Michael Quetting begins his memoir Papa Goose: One year, seven goslings, and the flight of my life by saying, ‘I’m heavily pregnant with nonuplets. At least that’s pretty much how I feel right now.’ Read a few chapters of this joyous book a night and you’ll go to sleep happy. Read on >

  • With an image on each page, this book has you smiling one minute and then suddenly tearing up. It’s the perfect gift for any dog lover, and you might find yourself to strive harder to live up to the brilliant person your dog sees you as. Read on >

  • Axel Linden’s On Sheep: Diary of a Swedish Shepherd ruminates on another domesticated mammal that even animal lovers don’t tend to look fondly upon. Indeed, calling someone a ‘sheep’ is an insult meant to insinuate stupidity. Read on >

  • The Eastern Curlew explores how Australia’s largest migratory shorebird – which sports an impressive curving bill five times longer than its head – flies 10 000 kilometres from Artic breeding grounds to feed on soldier crabs and molluscs populating mudflats on Australia’s east coast. Read on >

  • Alison Lester, who in 2012, became the Australia’s first Children’s Book Laureate, always writes and illustrates perfect little books for young children. Noni the Pony Rescues a Joey has such charming rhyming verse that it would be a pleasure to read aloud to the littlies. And the wonderfully expressive faces of the animals help to bring this happy little story to life. Read on >

  • Barbara Bancroft’s illustrations are, as always, distinctively big, bold and beautiful and the story is simply told by first-time children’s author, Nina Lawrence. But this is a story with a difference. It is a bilingual tale told in English and translated in Djambarrpuynu language from North East Arnhem Land. With many schools now promoting indigenous Australian languages this would be a wonderful introduction and inspiration for their students. Read on >

  • Once in a while, a book comes into your life that is so beautiful that you desperately want to give it to someone you love. This is that book for me. I Am the Seed that Grew the Tree is a collection of poems for children. There’s a poem for every day of the year. Read on >

  • Daykin has a quirky style that takes some getting used to. However, the story rollicks along with such enthusiasm that we soon adjust to the style and are abs orbed by the mystery. The characters are an interesting mix of eccentric, weird and relatively normal. Elvis, the youngest character, is often the most mature and sensible of the group. This is a fun exploration of issues that are important to all of us: who are we, where did we come from, and to whom do we belong? Read on >

  • This is a poignant, often thrilling story – beautifully illustrated by Emily Gravett – that gives permission to the reader to wonder about the greatest mystery of all: what happens afterwards. Read on >

  • For Peter, an unfathomable fear oppresses him. His calculating mind tallies, adds, subtracts and deciphers square roots – all to cloud the fear and allow him a somewhat normal existence. That is, until his mother becomes an unfortunate victim in an assassination attempt and his sister suspiciously disappears. Read on >

See all Book Reviews for this Issue

Subscribe to Good Reading

The Good People