SUBSCRIBE |  

Forgot Your Username and Password? Click here.

Subscribe to Good Reading now

Mark and Evette Moran Nib Literary Award 2021 shortlist announced

Mark and Evette Moran Nib Literary Award 2021 shortlist announced

Waverly Council have announced the 2021 shortlist for the Mark and Evette Moran Nib Literary Award.

The Award is celebrated annually and recognises excellence in writing, research, readability and value to the community.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the award and offers a total prize of $28,500. Additionally, it’s the only major literary award in Australia that is presented by a local council.

The 2021 shortlist is a collection of research-based works and the finalists were selected from a total of 150 nominations from across Australia.

Nib Award Head Judge Jamie Grant said the shortlisted works explored by the authors “range from literature to agriculture, from environmentalism to religion, and from art history to Aboriginal affairs, set in places as widely separated as an aristocratic estate in Germany, the mountains and fertile valleys of Spain in a book that also explores the Mulga plains of south-west Queensland, the rich soil near Moree in NSW, and a childhood spent partly within walking distance of the Waverley Council local government area.”

The winner will be awarded a prize of $20,000 and an additional prize of $2,500 will be awarded to a finalist for the People’s Choice Prize. Voting for the People’s Choice Prize is open from 27 September – 25 October here.

The winners will be announced via an online event on 24 November. 

Check out the 2021 shortlist:

Son of the Brush, Tim Olsen (Allen & Unwin)

Only Happiness Here: In Search of Elizabeth von Arnim, Gabrielle Carey (UQP)

The Winter Road: A Story of Legacy, Land and a Killing at Croppa Creek, Kate Holden (Black Inc)

A Letter to Layla: Travels to Our Deep Past and Near Future, Ramona Koval (Text Publishing)

The Believer: Encounters with Love, Death & Faith, Sarah Krasnostein (Text publishing)

Amnesia Road: Landscape, violence and memory, Luke Stegemann (New South Books)